FAQ

1.)    What is ATA®?        

ATA® is a proprietary line of high performance cut and abrasion resistant yarns / fibers, made EXCLUSIVELY by Worldwide Protective Products. ATA® can be made with several different components (such as Twaron®, Fiberglass, Stainless Steel, Polyethylene, Polyester, Nylon, etc.), and is produced using state of the art manufacturing techniques and processes.

2.) Does ATA® have the same heat and/ or abrasion properties as Kevlar®?

Yes.  Most forms of ATA® have very similar heat and abrasion properties as para-aramid (Kevlar®) yarns.  Please consult our website or speak to a  Worldwide Protective Products customer service representative to find out the exact properties of a specific product.

3.) Does ATA® cost less than Kevlar®?

In most cases yes. Very often, substantially less.

4.) What is the difference in a 7, 10, or 13 gauge glove?

The gauge number refers to the size and type of needles used in a seamless knitting machine to produce a glove.  In simple terms, the higher the gauge #, the thinner the glove (ie: a 13 gauge glove is typically thinner than a 10 gauge glove)  Higher gauge gloves are typically more form fitting and dexterous, while lower gauge gloves are typically bulkier and less dexterous.

5.) How is the cut level determined?

The cut level of a glove or sleeve is determined using one of 3 laboratory grade apparatuses that employ the use of weights and precision razor blades to measure cuts achieved through a particular product.  A mathematical equation is used to turn the data recorded by the apparatus into a cut resistance level for that product.

6.) What is the difference between ANSI and CE cut resistant ratings?

The ratings are very different from each other and are obtained using different machines and methods.

ANSI cut ratings are governed by ASTM testing method F1790-97 and F1790-05 and are achieved using an apparatus called the CPPT Tester , or the TDM tester.  The reported results indicate the load or weight (in grams) applied that is required to cut the material at a specified distance (20mm or 25mm) of blade travel across the product (ie: 1734 grams) which is known as the “Rating Force”.  This number is then compared to the ANSI 105-2011 table of “Classification for Cut Resistance” and the glove’s cut resistance level (1 through 5) is determined.  The higher the “Rating Force”, the more cut resistant the material is considered.

CE cut ratings are governed by CEN testing method EN388 and are achieved using an apparatus called the Couptester.  The reported Couptest results indicate a ratio of the # of machine cycles required to cut the sample material vs. the # of machine cycles required to cut a specified cotton control material.  This value is know as the “Cut Index”.  This number is then compared to the EN388 table for “Mechanical Risk Protection” and the glove’s cut resistance level (1 through 5) is determined.  The higher the “Cut Index”, the more cut resistant the material is considered.

PLEASE NOTE:  The ANSI and CE cut resistant rating are achieved using completely different testing parameters and apparatuses – the reported results are NOT interchangeable under any circumstances.

7.) What is the difference between ANSI and CE abrasion resistance ratings?

The ratings are very different from each other and are obtained using two different machines and methods.

ANSI abrasion ratings are governed by ASTM testing method D3389-05 (for coated gloves) or D3884-09 (for uncoated gloves) and are achieved using an apparatus called the Taber Abraser.  The reported Taber results indicate the number of cycles that is required to “break through” the material (ie: 1300 cycles). This value is known as the “Cycles to Fail”.  This number is then compared to the ANSI 105-2011 table of “Classification for Abrasion Resistance” and the glove’s Abrasion resistance level (1 through 6) is determined.  The higher the “Cycles to Fail”, the more abrasion resistant the material is considered.

CE abrasion ratings are governed by CEN testing method EN388 and are achieved using an apparatus called the Martindale tester.  The reported Martindale results indicate a # of machine cycles required to “rub through” the material (ie 4000 cycles).  This value is know as the “Abrasion Performance Level”.  This number is then compared to the EN388 table for “Mechanical Risk Protection” and the glove’s abrasion resistance level (1 through 5) is determined.  The higher the “Abrasion Performance Level”, the more abrasion resistant the material is considered.

8.) What laundering procedures are recommended for our cut resistant products?

Most of Worldwide Protective Products are laundry friendly, using a mild detergent in warm water and low heat drying.  The use of bleach is not recommended for most of our industrial cut resistant products.  Please refer to our website or speak to a Worldwide Protective Products customer service representative for exact laundry instructions on a specific product.

9.) What glove coating is best for my application?

The coating that best suits your particular application can be determined by a multitude of factors and elements.  Every end user application is different so no one set or rules apply to all.  Typically:

Latex is great for general purpose, dry applications and offers good abrasion and puncture resistance        

Nitrile is great for high wear, oily applications and offers great abrasion resistance and a “latex allergy free” product

PU (polyurethane) is very soft and great for high tactile sensitivity applications  and offers good abrasion resistance and launders well

PVC is good for general purpose applications with good abrasion resistance and is very economical

10.) Do I really need a cut level 5?  How do I determine what level is best for me?

Achieving an ANSI cut resistance rating of level 5 on a knitted glove is no small accomplishment.  A material that is rated level 5 in the ANSI specification, is an extremely cut resistant product.  Most level 5 gloves today are made with strands of stainless steel incorporated into the yarns used to knit the glove.  With this high level of cut resistance typically comes a higher cost.  Every end user application is different.  Some jobs where cutlery and sharp tools or objects are in use around the clock may require a cut level 5 product (such as in food processing). However, many customers have discovered that lower cut level gloves give ample protection for their particular application at a savings to their company.  If you have any questions or concerns regarding what cut level is best for your application, please contact us and let a Worldwide Protective Products hand protection specialist assist you in selecting the right cut level for the job.  Whether it’s level 5 or level 1 we have the right product for you.